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Dreams and Change


Did you ever have a dream where when you wake up you just can’t believe what you were able to do in the dream? Where there were no limitations within the dream? And yet you were still experiencing a sense of freedom… Really experiencing it? And when you woke you still had the feeling of the dream?


“Experience“ is a funny thing. We have experiences every day. It’s kind of difficult to not have an experience. And whether we know it or not or believe it or not each of us experiences life in our own way. Meaning that no one can have an experience like you do.

So back to this “experience“ thing. Each of us has sole ownership over our experiences. There’s a lot of power in that. I mean, seeing as we do have control over how we have an experience. So that’s the really good part when it comes to being able to change for the better.


In life, we generate experiences not only based on the reality of things but also through our imagination… And that’s where we are able to exercise our innate creativity to change. And here the possibilities are endless.… Simply because our imagination is endless.

Dreams are the perfect example of the potential of our imagination and where we can take it for limitless possibilities in our lives. Exercise the freedom that you have in a dream, and you can exercise your fullest potential to make dreams come true.




About the Author

For over 20 years, John Cane has coached, given workshops, and speaking engagements to over 100,000 individuals in areas of Self Improvement. John is a Certified Integrated Wellness Coach (Mind, Body, and Spirit), motivational speaker, and writer. He has six certifications in Personal Growth and Development. His Journal Books, ‘Important Things I Remember from My Parents’ are used in schools and as an aid for adults in gaining strength in self-identity in the United States and Europe. John is currently a Doctoral Candidate in Psychology & Interdisciplinary Inquiry at Saybrook University, Pasadena, California. His focus of research is in the psychology of creativity and its relationship to survival and fulfillment in everyday life.